Guide to fictional Libraries #4 Kansas City Public Library

Following the lead of The Matilda Project The Alibi Library has decided to produce a short series highlighting the work of some of the best fictional libraries:

I decided to include this library in this section given that most of you just won´t believe it´s real when you see the pictures of it:

Kansas City Public Library (Missouri, United States) 02 HASM

The Kansas City Public Library founded in 1873, is the oldest and third largest public library system in the metropolitan Kansas City area.

Kansas-City-Public-Library-Missouri_1

The Books

Its special collection include original published materials, news articles, post cards, photographs, maps, and city directories dating from the community’s earliest history. The Library’s Ramos Collection includes books, pamphlets, journal articles and other materials relating to African-American history and culture.

“The Community Bookshelf” (building design) itself showcases 22 titles reflecting a wide variety of reading interests as suggested by Kansas City readers and then selected by The Kansas City Public Library Board of Trustees.”

filename-p1130424-jpg

Teens Library Blog

The blog has a section on:

Teen Book Reviews – Manga

and this

Violence Among Us: Books that Focus on School Shootings

which must be something of a concern for young teens stateside.

Unfortunately Kansas City also has:

072910_GunLib_KansasCity_1a

Finishing on a brighter note this sculpture from the atrium:
 
“Good As Gold,” Donald Lipski.

“Good As Gold,” Donald Lipski.

Coming up Matilda, Ghostbusters, Star Wars…

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4 thoughts on “Guide to fictional Libraries #4 Kansas City Public Library

    1. lesley keast

      Dear Mr Librarian (I´m sorry I don´t know your name, so let’s keep it formal),
      I think the architect who designed the outside of this library should be given a lot more work to cheer up our boring cities. All that colour! So many other places should employ her/him e.g.
      schools with big crayons, scissors and pencil sharpeners or hospitals covered in big bed pans, syringes and bandages
      Yours sincerely
      L

      Reply
      1. alibilibrary Post author

        Dear L

        The architects in question go under the name of Dimensional Innovations. We have forwarded a copy of your correspondence to them with a supporting letter from ourselves. However, on investigation their designs for schools fall clearly short of your demanding standards. This image of their sign for Park Hill should give you some idea.

        http://www.infinitysignsystems.com/galleries.html#5

        Alternatively, these images of crazy school buses (not by DI) may serve as compensation.

        http://www.google.es/imgres?imgurl=http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_ZlzB8sNNqlM/SOsvWZdfFiI/AAAAAAAAAf4/XAenqS8DrWU/s400/double_school_bus.jpg&imgrefurl=http://topperstruck.blogspot.com/2008/10/coolest-school-buses.html&usg=__yt-dlcsj3YdMzM-GB3ZFJsH50Q4=&h=266&w=320&sz=34&hl=es&start=10&zoom=1&tbnid=xQiA_3oJ_ZfDaM:&tbnh=98&tbnw=118&ei=HfGLUbLsKOmI7AaF-YGAAw&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dcoolest%2Bschool%26hl%3Des%26gbv%3D2%26tbm%3Disch&itbs=1&sa=X&ved=0CD4QrQMwCQ

        Yours faithfully,

        Mr Archibald Lib and Mr Ignatius Rary

        The Alibi Library

  1. Andrés Álvarez

    Dear Mr Librarian,

    I recently went for a walk here in Manchester and found out that a “new library” was opened. This special library showcases objects from the Manchester Museum’s outstanding collection. So, instead of books you can find preserved animals, plants and fossils, collected from around the world over the last 200 years. You will also be able to find out where the specimens come from, how they are used for research and what they mean to people today. The Nature’s Library is the complete refurbishment of one of Manchester Museum’s Grade II* listed galleries. This was originally designed by the renowned Victorian architect Alfred Waterhouse, who also designed Manchester’s Town Hall and the Natural History Museum in London.

    I would suggest you, and your readers, visiting or even travelling (without moving) to the Mancunian and rainy city and sneak a peek to this superb place. In the mean time, just click on the link below:
    http://www.creativetourist.com/articles/heritage/manchester/preview-natures-library-at-manchester-museum/

    Look forward to hearing from you

    Kind regards

    A.

    Reply

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