Tag Archives: library fiction

Library campaigners descend on parliament to defend public funding

Authors including Cathy Cassidy and Philip Ardagh have joined librarians lobbying MPs to protect the service from cuts that have seen 441 branches closed since 2010.
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Writers & illustrators supporting libraries including John Dougherty, Philip Ardagh and Jake Arnott and Sarah McIntyre. Photograph: @jabberworks/Twitter
At a packed hall in Westminster, flanked with colourful handmade banners with “save our libraries” slogans, bestselling authors including children’s authors Alan Gibbons, Cathy Cassidy, and Philip Ardagh joined the Speak Up for Libraries campaign, Librarians and supporters from across the UK to urge MPs to focus on what they see as the root cause of the decline in libraries – the “apathy and ignorance” in local and central government.
Library funding has been cut by more than £180m over the last five years – a drop of 16% – corresponding with a 93% increase in volunteers working in libraries and a 22% drop in staff since 2010.
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National Libraries Day

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The Alibi Library enjoyed celebrating National Libraries day with everyone this weekend!!  We all have hangovers and alibis after our own bookathon involving the Sherlock Holmes series in which one was expected to drink a snifter every time a body part was mentioned. Unfortunately the word “hand” proved rather more frequent than we´d imagined:

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Other Library Day events were better organised and well supported. Find out about more events and follow up here and here:

National Libraries Day

The Library Campaign

Next up Valentine´s Day for a romantic rendezvous in a Library near you!

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Guide to fictional Libraries #16 A Madrid Summer Night´s Dream pt 2 Sci- Fi

Madrid, the town I have chosen  to call home for the last ten years, has a multitude of libraries that might well have fallen straight from the pages of a fantasy or science fiction novel. Despite drastic cuts carried out in the name of austerity, most of the libraries included here are open to the general public and I encourage the Madrileños to support their local with a visit.

For Sci-Fi  we should start with my local, Pedro Salinas, in Puerta de Toledo, constructed in 1992 by Juan Navarro Baldeweg, zapped out of Terry Eagleton´s discworld.

pedro-salinas-library5.1navarro-toledoLa biblioteca Ana Maria Matute in Carabanchel, by RSP architects, like some crazy glass headed dinosaur.

ana maria matuteamatutefachadaNoname aaThe Rafael Alberti Library by Andrés Perea Ortega with its magnificent Mies van der Rohe facade:

7a1 d885c2358f7119b7f830ccebb6298d2d1307964258_740215_0000000000_noticia_normalThe Gloria Fuertes public library whose cyclopian facade stares out over a bleak Barajas.

gloria fuerThe Luis Martin Santos Library in Vallecas created by architects Mario San Juan Calle, Ángel Sevillano Martín e Iván Carpintero López enjoys some fantastic reading spaces:

luis martin-santos vallecas07 descarga 02The Jose Hierro library in Usera (Ábalos y Herreros, 2002) functionally designed to act as a “catalyst” in the local community.

useraThe Mara Moliner Library by Miguel Cabanes Ginés, Elena Robles Alonso, Pedro Gambín Hurtado (2013)

Mara MolinerThe ESIC Library of Marketing Finance and Economy

esic marketing finanzas economiaRather more well known is the library of the Reina Sofia modern art gallery by Jean Nouvel.

robinson4-18-12images (4)images (3)bibliotecaLeon Tolstoi in Las Rozas seems to have simply appeared out of nowhere since no reference to its construction can be found.  An invisible architect?

leon tolstoi majadehondaOr how about the polytechnic University library, below?

politecnica-madridAnd near to the Retiro these two gems:

Casa de Fieras:

descarga (1)Biblioteca Retiro in the Calle Doctor Esquerdo:retiroRetiro 300x300These and other gems in the Community of Madrid have suffered cuts to services, budgets, opening times affecting users, collections, reading groups etc

Support your local library to avoid situations like this one (Bilblioteca Publica Joaquin Vilumbrales, Alcorcon) where local protest was necessary to restore their access to something like approaching a good library service.DSC00453

Guide to fictional Libraries #14 Non-fiction: Mobile libraries

I always think of the yellow county council vans of England when someone mentions Mobile Library Services.

mobile-library-in-rural-northumberland-237869600Here are a few imaginative alternatives:

BiblioburroColumbia

5c59556827c01994fc55781ebbe91671Mongolia.

451341f078cc6c5caa3041a24c6bd74fCartagena de Indias, Colombia

500dada17de63bc011f5d1b5fac2ce29Airstream Library. USA

5ae3f36d2d655d30c0274986f885530eApparently owned by Jim Hensen.

Thanks to http://www.thepolisblog.org for the wonderful post from which much of this information has been cribbed.

Guide to fictional Libraries #12 The Unseen University Library

Following the lead of The Matilda Project The Alibi Library has decided to produce a short series highlighting the work of some of the best fictional libraries:

In a month that saw the great Terry Pratchett attack the Education Minister’s reforms, the Alibi Library has chosen to honour his fantastic book cycle and the Unseen University Library.

Nunc id Vides, Nunc ne Vides (“Now you see it, Now you don’t.”)

The Library:

The Unseen University Library features chained books not unlike the Bodleian library at Oxford, although there it is done to protect the books from the students, whereas at UU it is done to protect the students from the books.

Unseen Academicals

The high concentration of magical lore has warped the Library interior into a locus of L-Space.  This library-space, is the ultimate portrayal of Pratchett’s concept that the written word has powerful magical properties on the Discworld, and that in large quantities all books warp space and time around them. The principle of L-space revolves around a seemingly logical equation;

 \text{Books} = \text{Knowledge} = \text{Power} = \frac{\text{Mass} \times \text{Distance}^2}{\text{Time}^3}.

Large quantities of magical and mundane books create portals into L-space that can be accessed using innate powers of librarianship. Because libraries with enough books to open a portal are often large and sprawling, those venturing into L-space may not necessarily know that they have arrived. The floor and ceiling of L-space follow the floor and ceiling of the library used to access it; the best example of this is that the central dome of Unseen University’s library is “always overhead”.  In every direction and as far as the eye can see bookshelves stretch off, meaning the nature of any walls are unknown.

“good bookshop is just a genteel blackhole that knows how to read.”

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Because L-space links every library, (and also possibly Death’s Autobiography Library) it is possible to reach any one of these in all space, time and the multiverse. There are indeed potentially other forms of data storage other than books as it represents every library anywhere. Additionally, one can read any book ever written, any book that will be written at some point and books that were planned for writing that were not, as well as any book that could possibly be written (note that this does not mean knowledge of everything; how would you distinguish the “correct” books from the “incorrect” ones?). As this is a form of interdimensional and time travel, there are strict limits on its use, and the Librarians of Time and Space, that is those who have access to L-space have developed three simple rules to ensure abuse is kept to a minimum:

  1. Silence
  2. Books must be returned by the last date stamped
  3. Do not interfere with the nature of casuality

Librarian_(Discworld)

The Librarian:

Access to libraries of other times or other realities is restricted to the librarian himself.

The Librarian chooses to take the form of an orang-utan having discovered that being one had certain advantages for a librarian – he can climb up to high shelves, for example.

Being an ape, he is known for his violent reaction to most people calling him a “monkey.” He speaks a language whose vocabulary consists primarily of the single word Ook and occasionally Eeek, but most people seem able to understand him.

The Librarian’s name has never been given in any of the books; he is always simply ‘the Librarian though he may once have been Dr. Horace Worblehat. Aside from his library duties his hobbies seem to involve playing keyboards (and his organ has a vox diabolica stop, a thunder pedal, and a 256-ft Earthquake pipe) or spending his leisure hours at the Mended Drum, where he drinks quietly unless provoked, eats prodigious quantities of peanuts, and plays a ruthless game of Cripple Mr Onion with anyone foolish enough to take him on.

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The Clients:

Access to the library is open to inhabitants of Ankh  Morpork, although non-magic users may get lost.  Theoretically, according to the strict word of the Lore, women are barred entrance to the library on the grounds that their inferior brains can’t handle it but in practice this has not been the case.

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Information courtesy of T. Pratchett and the wonderful contributors to Wikipedia

Coming up;  The Plume Library, Charlie Higson, Carole Boston Weatherford